What You Should Know About MS and What To Do

This tip from: www.DebbieMS.com
“What to Know—What to Do”
MS has many misconceptions associated with it, and cognitive impairment may be one of them. Lately, it seems that I read and hear more and more about how MS is the cause for memory issues that MSers experience–it is gaining a reputation for brain dysfunctioning. And along with the increased reputation comes the increased fear.
Although MS can cause cognitive issues, it is important to know that they are NOT the most typical symptoms of MS. It is estimated that 40-50% of people with MS experience mild to moderate impairment; severe cognitive decline like dementia are extremely rare (source: MSIF.org).
What are these impairments? Things such as:
• Long-term concentration; inattention; distraction
• Forgetfulness
• Planning or problem solving difficulties
• Loss in thought processes; word finding
• Not thinking quickly or clearly; “brain fog”
BUT, these types of difficulties can also be the result of other factors such as age, hormones, menopause, overload, stress, drugs, fatigue, depression and lack of sleep.
For example, up to two-thirds of women report forgetfulness and other mental disturbances during hormonal shifts of menopause! So, maybe that 40-50% estimate is really lower in reality.
There is something called neuropsychological testing, and more people in the MS community are talking about them. These tests were designed to measure cognitive difficulties. However, unlike some other areas of measurement, with these tests 1) there is no single test that measures everything that the brain does, and 2) there are wide variations in how/what types of tests are done and their conclusions. Furthermore, the testing can be strenuous and expensive.
In the end, does knowing the test details make much difference in one’s life? Doesn’t it make more sense to learn about these cognitive difficulties and what can be one done to overcome them?
What to Do and Why
• Exercise your brain. Practice brain games, crossword puzzles, and memory exercises that stress verbal skills.
• Enrich your diet with plenty of omega-3 fats, low-glycemic index carbohydrates (e.g., whole grains) and antioxidants. Walnuts and fish high in omega-3 fatty acids (including sardines and salmon) fight artery-damaging inflammation. Antioxidants raise acetylcholine, which is an essential neurotransmitter for memory. Berries, especially blueberries, are loaded with anthocyanins – potent antioxidants that protect cells, including those in the brain. Blueberries may also have the power to create new pathways for connection in the brain.
• Eat several smaller meals throughout the day. Eating small meals prevents dips in blood glucose levels, and glucose is the primary energy source for the brain.
• Take walks daily and do stretching exercises. Increased cardio can make your brain actually grow, with more white matter and more neuron connections.
• Do stretching/relaxation exercises and meditation to reduce anxiety and stress.Stress causes the body to release cortisol. Cortisol—the body’s stress hormone– has been found to shrink the memory/learning centers in the brain, which results in impaired memory.
• Make sure your body is getting enough iron. Iron helps the neurotransmitters essential to memory function properly.
• Make sure you are getting enough sleep. Anyone who’s ever stayed up all night recognizes that next-day brain fuzziness, when it seems like nothing really registers or is available for recall later. That is what’s happening. Different parts of the brain are responsible for creating different types of memories – a face, a name, or just the recollection that you met someone. Sleep is also needed to make long-term memories last.
• Focus on one task at a time to keep a recollection of each one. When you do multiple tasks, the brain switches processing to another region that retains fewer details. For example, listening to the news while reading something will impair your ability to recall either later.
• Check your cholesterol. The plaque buildup can block the blood vessels in your brain, deprive it of valuable nutrients, and cue memory problems.
• Keep thin or lose weight. The brains of obese people work harder than those of normal weight people to achieve the same results, according to researchers at Carnegie Mellon University. High blood pressure and inflammation—both of which strike obese people hard–irritate the brain’s communication networks, making it more difficult for the brain to receive messages.
• Many prescription drugs can affect your memory, and the older you are, the longer drugs stay in your system. Drugs that can cause memory lapses include antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, beta-blockers, sleeping pills, painkillers, antihistamines, and statins.
Easy Memory Tricks
1. Repeat yourself. To help get a routine activity lodged in your brain, say it out loud as you do it. “I’m getting the stamps” – fends off distraction as you go to get them. You may sound crazy, but rehearsal is one of the best tricks for memory. Memory experts also advise that you repeat a person’s name as you are introduced.
2. Bite off bigger pieces. Since your brain can process only so much information at a time, try chunking bits together. By repeating a phone number as “thirty-eight, twenty-seven” instead of “3, 8, 2, 7,” you only have to remember two numbers, not four.
3. Give words more meaning. When you’re introduced – let’s say to Elton – connect the name to someone (“Elton John”), a place, etc. Or you can use rhymes—“Dennis plays tennis.”
4. Create unlikely connections. For example, switching a watch to the other wrist when you need to remember something. The oddity of not finding the watch where it should be triggers recall.
5. Practice paying attention. What was your neighbor wearing this morning? Even if you’ll never need the information, forcing yourself to observe and recall the details of your day sharpens your memory.
6. Do something mentally challenging. Working a crossword puzzle, or learning an instrument or foreign language creates fresh connections in the brain. It can actually generate new cells in the brain’s hippocampus (i.e. the brain’s learning/memory center). Those new cells build cognitive reserves that are important for creating new memories and may protect against memory loss – even dementia – later in life. A timed game like Boggle or Simon will force you to pay attention, work quickly, and think flexibly.
In summary, if a MSer is experiencing some type of cognitive problem, it may be prudent to initially think through the possible causes and try commonsense solutions to improve it.

 

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